Dreaming of Dancing Burritos


Poorly suppressed power levels.
September 1, 2009, 12:22 pm
Filed under: awesome, fangirl, lolwut, office, toys

The T and I got around to comparing our workstations earlier despite our somehow busy workdays. Behold the signs of barely (if ever) suppressed power levels:

The pic on the left is T’s, the one on the right taken with a crappy camera is mine.

…goddamn, he has a Decadriver. In the office. ONORE DI–pffft, whatever.

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Shin Megami Tensei Devil Summoner 2: Raidou Kuzunoha vs. King Abaddon Raiho Limited Edition mini review
July 20, 2009, 3:45 am
Filed under: appeals to the capitalist in you, awesome, fangirl, review, toy review

(also, Gundam 00 Multibox Nandemo Haro)

Something awesome happened during my usual weekly date with the Nyan yesterday.
We were facing the front display of the Data Blitz shop in MoA, and our conversation went like this:

Him: Hey, look!
Me: (stares at the display box  of an arcade stick and Wii Fit) Er what?
Him: Look!
Me: (peers at the WoW toy) What am I supposed to look at?
Him: (takes hold of my head and turns it a bit to the side) LOOK!
Me: (sees the SMT Devil Summoner 2 Limited Raiho Edition) OH SHIT OH SHIT OH SHIT OH SHIT

A few minutes and almost three thousand pesos later, we got out of the Data Blitz branch toting around a big yellow plastic bag containing what could be my luckiest find for these past few months:

This is Shin Megami Tensei Devil Summoner 2: Raidou Kuzunoha vs. King Abaddon for the PlayStation 2. Now, saying that what I bought is a limited edition of the game really isn’t accurate – this is the only edition of the game’s North American release, with Raiho plushies thrown into every copy of the game with nary a dollar added to its SRP.

However, the game itself is rare, and each box bears a serial number “to ensure its rarity and collectible value,” according to Atlus’ press release. (Note to self: when selling items in the internet, add a serial number sticker to increase profits by 50%)

These are the contents: the Raiho plush and the game. The Raiho is immensely cute as promised, sporting its own bancho uniform and sharp sideburns just like his predecessor, Raidou Kuzunoha. He has a little cape , though his bunny tail is nowhere to be found. Leaving out a small detail like this is tantamount to blasphemy, but it’s okay. A tailless Raiho is better than no Raiho, after all.

I regretted opening the package when I realized that every copy of the game has its own serial number, but then again I really don’t have any plans of reselling it. Raiho and Devil Summoner 2 will join Ouendan and other awesome games in my shelf, and it will of course be the centerpiece.

Oh look, Raiho’s snuck out of the box and is trying to hide in–wait, is that a Haro? Yes I believe that’s a Haro; The Gundam 00 Multibox Nandemo Haro, to be exact. As hinted by its name, its a Haro that serves as a box to hold various things in: knick knacks, snacks, toys, etc. You may even use it as a desktop trash bin if you like, but…that’s a Haro!

I managed to spot it despite its rather unassuming box, which was almost covered underneath a mountain of model kits in Robinson’s Galleria’s Toys R’ Us. The packaging is rather plain, but hey, there’s no missing Haro. The box contains the upper and lower half of the Haro, and a stand so it won’t go rolling off your desk and to its doom, as well as a sticker sheet containing two pairs of Haro eyes, one black and one red.

I decided to use the black eyes; red against bright orange background doesn’t look too good.

It’s rather large, and it’s by far the biggest Haro in my collection. Shown in this picture alongside the Nandemo Haro for comparison purposes are the pink Haro Capsule, which contained a Gundam Seed figure, and a tiny silver gift Haro that came with additional gift packaging and ribbon.



Manga Review: Saint Young Men (aka Jesus is a weeaboo)
May 26, 2009, 3:58 pm
Filed under: anime-related, fangirl, lolwut, manga review, random, review



…or, what if God (and Buddha) was one of us.

If you’re still familiar with one-hit wonder Joan Osbourne’s If God Was One of Us, then you may have played around with that thought. Did you imagine the earthbound Jesus as the  holier version of King Midas, who turned everything he touched into gold? Did His footsteps turn the hot asphalt He walked on into holy ground? Was He even remotely human, in every sense of the word?

What if He was just chillin’ in a rented studio apartment, with Buddha as his roomie?

In Nakamura Hikaru’s Saint Young Men, two of the poster men of religion, Jesus Christ and Buddha, decide to take a break from their work and descend into Japan (surprise, surprise) for good old R&R. They rent an apartment, and judging by Buddha’s stricken reaction at Jesus’ exorbitant purchases, they’re also restricted to a certain budget. Will they enjoy their vacation? Maybe, if only their divinity wasn’t in the way.

Contrary to the Jesus Christ in every Christian’s minds, Nakamura’s rendition of the Son of God is incredibly human and a tad carefree, to the point of being a bit out-of-character at first glance. To Japanese highschool girls who catch glimpse of Him buying food in the nearest kombini, He is that Johnny Depp-lookalike who has a penchant for the Shinsen-gumi. He owns a Vaio, and is a J-dorama blogger who makes sure His reviews come out the same day that the episodes get aired – and His blog gets thousands of hits per day.

Tl;dr, Jesus is a weeaboo, just like us.


On the other hand, Buddha of Saint Young Men is truer to the Buddhist doctrine as the man who has discovered the Middle Way (the path between the two extremes of hedonism and self-mortification): he is temperate, scolds Jesus for squandering their limited vacation allowance on needless luxuries like a beginner’s clay modeling kit, and a full set of Shinsen-gumi cosplay, and absolutely loathes the extreme sensation of riding the rollercoaster. But he finds it in himself to become a Leah Dizon fan.

As expected of a manga of this genre, Saint Young Men pokes a small jab at its protagonists, putting Christianity and Buddhism in a humorous light. The manga even goes so far as to “reveal” that the fabled Baptism in the Jordan River was not a proof of Jesus’ divinity more than a show of John the Baptist’s great compassion, and that the white dove that descended from the heavens was the Father Himself, inquiring about the welfare of His slightly aquaphobic Son.

Jesus’ addiction to blogging was also explained as a manifestation of his desire for an audience; whether or not this translates to craving attention depends on the readers. I myself know that this isn’t always the case.

One of the bigger questions about this manga is whether or not Nakamura’s Jesus was too out of character. Is He, really? Jesus of the Bible was capable of playing truant as a kid to show His wits (or youthful presumptuousness?) off to them pesky old men; He certainly was cheeky enough to make His unbelieving disciple to touch his wounds just to show that he was that same person who died on the cross. 

He was also human enough to wreak havoc on the merchants in His Father’s temple – but this manga series does not emphasize His righteous anger (an error which will be righted in this particular sidestory).

One of the more obvious reasons why this obscure title shines is its irreverent handling of subject matter, yet never straying far from what could be the entire point of this manga series: Jesus (and Buddha, depending on your beliefs) was once human, just like us. Does it follow, then, that mere humans can transcend humanity and become divine?

Another point being, of course, that people of varying beliefs can hang out with each other and become roomies. It’ll be wonderful if that other religious figure (hint: turbans) made an appearance, but we all know what would probably ensue. Denmark knows .

Of course, this seems to be lost in the more orthodox lot of believers and those too narrow-minded to appreciate the message behind the satirical comedy that is practically on the same level as Cromartie High and Sayonara Zetsubou Sensei (thanks to its tasteful placement of cameos like that one God of the New World).

While the manga has reportedly been received warmly by the Christian and Catholic populations in Japan, the manga a good ice breaker between people of Christianity and Buddhism – and by extension, Shintoism – it’s obvious how people from the more fundamental Christian countries will take this gem: all fire and brimstone. And it’s sad, really.

For those who missed the scanlation link: Saint Young Men



Jesus Christ, it’s about time.
May 15, 2009, 8:35 am
Filed under: fangirl, gaems, lolwut, rage


Anime First Impressions: Ristorante Paradiso
April 28, 2009, 2:53 am
Filed under: anime review, anime-related, fangirl, first impressions, review
Before I proceed, let it be known that I never liked harem anime of any sort, be it the conventional harem or a reverse one. There are two exceptions though: Kyou Kara Maoh and this one, Ristorante Paradiso.

(…I’d like to explain why my exceptions are a bit…well, strange, but that’s besides the point.)

Here’s the gist: A young woman named Nicoletta searches for her estranged mother, and finds herself in a popular restaurant in Rome, staffed by a group of bespectacled, older gentlemen who, despite their age, seem to attract a number of fans of the female persuation.

I have to confess that I couldn’t help but cringe while writing the above paragraph. But no, this isn’t the same cringe as the Dragonball Evolution-type of cringe. Rather, this is a cringe of guilt. As in “this is horribly wrong but I like it so much” cringe.

Ristorante Paradiso’s characters are well thought-out and the cast makes for a promising brand of interaction. There’s spunky, impatient Nicoletta and her seemingly self-serving mother, Olga, who tries hard to make things appear A-OK to her husband all the while trying to patch things up with daughter in the most roundabout way possible thanks to her (typical) womanly pride.

Of course, the central characters – the gentlemanly staff of the restaurtant whose Italian name escapes me – are as interesting as your usual reverse harem cast of males, and a lot more.

But nevermind the entire restaurant staff, most viewers are interested with Nicoletta and the elderly waiter she’s crushing on, Claudio. It’s that one facet of the show that can potentially overshadow a lot of other things going on in the series. The producers know this fact very well too: the preview for Episode 2 already shows an aroused Nicoletta struggling to (gasp) undress a shocked yet submissive Claudio. Yes, cue another guilty cringe coming.

I’d like to rave more about it, but suffice it to say that the series kicked-off nicely. Sharing the same smooth, silky ambience of Bartender, Ristorante Paradiso may very well be that one guilty pleasure that merits a space in the typical anime viewer’s hard drive, but never quite show off to other enthusiasts.


Dragonball: Evolution movie impressions
April 11, 2009, 3:29 pm
Filed under: anime-related, fangirl, first impressions, gross, lolwut, rage, review


Haruki Murakami candy bar.
March 19, 2009, 2:46 pm
Filed under: boredom, fangirl, scribbles, writing

“It’s like a Haruki Murakami candy bar,” he said as he chewed my last packet of granola bar with utter relish while we waited in line at the ATM queue. “I don’t like it. I have my reasons for not liking it, but I understand why you love it so much.”

He masticated my favorite treat with a tentative relish; he hadn’t eaten anything substantial for a good several hours, and yet I asked him to accompany me on a longhaul trip on a quest to pick up my new DS. I knew how much he needed to eat something, anything; and his apparent need for nourishment somehow made his statement worthless.

It IS a Haruki Murakami candy bar. The petty intellectual side of you does not like it – and yet look at you; chewing it, swallowing it as readily as you would every single sentence that flowed out of Alan Moore’s pen.